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Fall 2014

  • Ph.D. student Jin Kyoung Hwang is one of six UC Irvine doctoral students awarded the prestigious Chancellor's Club Dissertation Fellowship. Chancellor's Club Fellowships, which provide $10,000 of support for dissertation research, are awarded to the best graduate students at UCI who also show great promise as future leaders. Ms. Kyoung’s research interests include second language and literacy development, ELLs, reading difficulties, language assessment, and early intervention. Her research agenda addresses the need to better understand heterogeneity in reading achievement within ESL student populations and how student subgroups respond to interventions intended to support them. Her dissertation findings are expected to provide specific policy and curricular recommendations for supporting students at various proficiency groups.

  • Ph.D. student Lynn Reimer presented at the November conference of the Association for Moral Education (AME) annual meeting in Pasadena. The 2014 conference theme was Thriving Individuals/Thriving Communities: Moral Education and Human Flourishing. Ms. Reimer's paper was titled "Prosocial Values and Adolescent Volunteerism in Underserved Neighborhoods." AME was founded in 1976 to "provide an interdisciplinary forum for professionals interested in the moral dimensions of educational theory and practice." Ms. Reimer, a second year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD), researches K-16 STEM education, problem solving, character development, and persistence/grit. She is advised by Professor Mark WarschuaerAbstract

  • Ph.D. student Chris Stillwell delivered two presentations at the fall 2014 CATESOL Conference held in Santa Clara. CATESOL (California Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) represents teachers of English throughout California and Nevada with the goals of promoting excellence in education and providing high-quality professional development. The 2014 conference theme was think, connect, create, and share. Mr. Stillwell's first presentation, titled "Cocktail Parties, Music, Mystery, and Listening Skill Development," summarized practical teaching techniques for language teachers. His second presentation, titled "The Delicate, Valuable Practice of Peer Observation," focused on techniques for collaborative professional development. Mr. Stillwell is a third year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). Abstracts 

  • Ph.D. student Christa Mulker Greenfader presented at the fall conference of the Teaching Artist Project at the California Council on Teacher Education (CCTE). The conference theme was Transforming Teacher Education Through the Arts. Ms. Greenfader's session was titled "Fostering Entitled the Oral Language of K-2 English Learners through Arts Activities." CCTE, founded in 1945, promotes the benefits to be gained from learning both in and through the arts: better understandings of subject matter, increased abilities to think critically and creatively, and enhanced development of personal and social qualities such as persistence in meeting challenges and empathy in relations with others. Ms. Greenfader is a fourth year doctoral student speciaiizing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). She is advised by Associate Professor Penelope Collins

  • Ph.D. student Cathy Tran has received a 2014-2015 Public Impact Fellowship. The award recognizes UC Irvine doctoral students who have the ability to convey their research to a broad audience and whose current research has the potential for substantial impact in the public sphere. Ms. Tran's research addresses the challenge of how to design learning environments that embrace failure and the benefits of learning from failure. Her project builds on work that shows that failure is crucial for developing deep knowledge because people are more likely to search for causes for failure than causes for success. Through projects with a science museum and an educational math company, she bridges the fields of educational psychology, cognition, affective science, and game design to study what influences productive persistence and how knowledge about those influential factors can guide the development of educational environments.


  • Members of the Teachers of Tomorrow (TOT) Club attended the 2015 Road to Teaching Conference held at Santa Ana College on November 22nd. The conference, presented by UC Irvine, CSU Fullerton, Fullerton College, and Santa Ana College, was funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Keynote speaker was California Teacher of the Year Timothy Smith. Participants could choose from over 25 workshops and presentations. TOT is a UCI club for all undergraduates interested in learning more about education. TOT attendees included Araceli Meza, Reyna Lanzas, Shona Bleumeneau (co-president), Hilda Kasravi (co-president), Diana Magana, Emily Dmytryk and Huitzi Jared. 

  • Teachers of Tomorrow finished its fall quarter by volunteering at Pretend City Children's Museum on December 6. Believing that play builds better brains and children learn best when they are actively engaged, Pretend City offers children a variety of activities in pretend environments, including an amphitheater, art studio, bank and ATM, beach, cafe, city hall, construction site, farm, gas station, grocery store, health center, marina, plaza, post office, park, and home. TOT members volunteer for quarterly community service activities. Participants included Araceli Meza (treasurer), Diana Magana (publicist), Emily Dmytryk (secretary), and co-presidents Shona Bleumeneau and Hilda Kasravi. Click on the image to access the larger photograph. 

  • The Cal Teach Math & Science Program hosted its fall 2014 pancake breakfast on November 21. Undergraduates in the program and undergraduates interested in learning about program options enjoyed freshly-griddled pancakes with all of the trimmings from 8:00 to 11:00 am in the Cal Teach offices at 137 Bison Modular. Serving as chef was Jennifer Molina, helped by Cal Teach Master Teacher Kris Houston and Cal Teach Counselor Whitney Young. Cal Teach offers undergraduates two options: a STEM degree plus a California Teacher Credential in four years, or a STEM degree in four years and a California Teacher Credential in an additional nine months. 

  • Ph.D. student Tyler Watts is lead author of the article "What’s Past Is Prologue: Relations Between Early Mathematics Knowledge and High School Achievement," published in the October 2014 issue of Educational Researcher. Co-authors are Distinguished Professor Greg Duncan, Robert Siegler (Carnegie Mellon University), and Pamela E. Davis-Kean (University of Michigan). Their article summarizes their research findings about early-grade mathematics knowledge and later mathematics achievement: Early ability predicts mathematics achievement through age 15. Mr. Watts, who is advised by Professor Duncan, is a third year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). He studies early childhood intervention and impact of income and social environments in later academic achievement. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Christa Mulker Greenfader is lead author on the forthcoming article “Effect of a Performing Arts Program on the Oral Language Skills of Young English Learners,” to be published in Reading Research Quarterly. Co-authors are Associate Professor Liane Brouillette and Professor George Farkas. The researchers studied a yearlong K-12 drama and creative movement intervention designed to improved the language skills of English Learners. They found that the EL students in the intervention performed better than the control group on speaking assessments and that the most limited English speakers benefited most from the program. Ms. Greenfader is a fourth year doctoral student speciailzing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). She is advised by Associate Professor Penelope CollinsAbstract

  • Ph.D. student Sooboin Yim is lead author on the article "Cloud-Based Collaborative Writing and the Common Core Standards," published in the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy. Co-authors are Professor Mark Warschauer, Assistant Professor Binbin Zheng, and Assistant Professor Joshua Lawrence. The researchers studied how cloud-based writing is used in a school district where one-to-one computer access with netbooks and open source software are provided to all students. Ms. Yim, a third year doctoral student specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT), is advised by Professor Warschauer. Her research interests include academic language development, English for Specific Purposes (ESP), language testing, and Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL). Abstract 

  • Fifth year Ph.D. in Education student Sarah Gilliland is sole author of an article in the Journal of Physical Education: "Clinical Reasoning in First- and Third-Year Physical Therapist Students." By comparing first and third year students, Ms. Gilliland researched how professional physical education therapy students were developing clinical reasoning skills. She found that third-year students used more sophisticated strategies while first year students employed only the simplest in addition to displaying faulty patterns of reasoning. Her findings are intended to inform curriclular design to promote more effective development of clinical reasoning. Ms. Gilliland, who is specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD), studies professional development and science education in addition to physical therapy education. Abstract 

  • Ph.D. in Education student Lynn Reimer presented at the Transforming Institutions: 21st Century Undergraduate STEM Education Conference in Indianapolis in October. The title of her presentation was "Clickers in the Wild: A Campus-Wide Study of Student Response Systems." Ms. Reimer's research, conducted at a major university, found a positive association between clicker use and grade in a gateway undergraduate STEM course and progression to a subsequent STEM course for women. Ms. Reimer is a  second year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). Her research interests include K-16 STEM education, problem solving, character development, and persistence/grit. She is advised by Professor Mark WarschuaerAbstract 

  • On November 5th, fifty students in Kim Burge's EDUC 137: Art in the Elementary School, met at the recently opened Newport Beach Civic Center Park Sculpture Exhibition for a walking tour of the nine currently installed sculptures. The nine sculptures were selected from 260 submissions by a six-member jury panel that included Dean Joe Lewis of the Clair Trevor School of the Arts. The UCI students used QUEST: Questions for Understanding, Exploring, Seeing and Thinking tools developed by the Harvard Graduate School of Education Project Zero’s Project Muse to engage with the works and to make presentations for each other. Read more.

  • High school students from the science class of Mr. Vincent Perez presented their designs for Santa Ana parks restoration during a poster session held at The Academy Charter High School on October 15 and 16. Each group of four students had been assigned a specific zip code in the 46th Congressional District and had to plan and design/redesign a park in that community based upon local ecological and health needs, within a $2,500,000 budget. Team members served as biologist, botanist, landscaper, and community/health expert. During the poster session each team presented its design to guests from the community.

  • Ph.D. student Tyler Watts and Assistant Professor Drew Bailey have published an article with colleagues in Psychological Science: "State and Trait Effects on Individual Differences in Children's Mathematical Development." Their research examined two longitudinal data sets by simultaneously modeling (a) effects of latent traits (stable characteristics that influence learning across time) and (b) states (prior knowledge). They found that latent trait effects on children's mathematical development were substantially larger than state effects. Abstract

  • Ph.D. Tara Barnhart and her advisor, Associate Professor Elizabeth van Es, have an article accepted for publication in Teaching and Teacher Education: "Examining the Relationship Among Pre-Service Science Teachers’ Ability to Attend, Analyze, and Respond to Student Thinking." Using a performance assessment of teacher competence, they compare two cohorts of science teacher candidates, one that participated in a video-based course designed to develop pre-service teachers' skills and one that did not participate in the course. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Sooboin Yim has received a $1,000 Korean Honor Scholarship from the Embassy of the Republic of Korea. The scholarship was established by the government of the Republic of Korea in 1981 to commemorate the 100th anniversay of the opening of diplomacy between Korea and the United States. Candidates are selected for the scholarship based on their grade average (3.5 or higher) and a review of their extracurricular activities, awards, performances, personal essay, and letter of recommendation. Ms. Yim is a third year doctoral student specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT). Her research interests include academic language development, English for Specific Purposes (ESP), language testing, and Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL).

  • Ph.D. student Alma Zaragoza-Petty has been awarded the UC Irvine President's Dissertation Year Fellowship in support of her dissertation research. The fellowship is awarded to a student in his or her final year of graduate study who is planning to pursue a teaching or research appointment. The fellowship provides full resident tuition, fees, a yearly living stipend, and an academic travel stipend. Ms. Zaragoza-Petty's doctoral research explores race/ethnicity, gender, class, and educational achievement, and higher education access and equity. Her dissertation is titled "'At Risk' College and Career Readiness: Reimagining Youth of Color in Continuation Schools." She is advised by Assistant Professor Tesha Sengupta-Irvine. Abstract 

  • Second year Ph.D. in Education students presented their findings from their first year research during the 2014 Fall Poster Session on October 3rd. During the session, students explained their reasons for selecting their research question, how the methodology chosen fit the research, and the importance of their findings. Faculty, staff, fellow students, and guests attended to review the range of research, engage in discussions, and provide feedback. Students are expected to follow-up with their advisor following the poster session and prepare their posters for submission to upcoming conferences. 2014 Poster Abstracts 

  • Tenth grade students from the science class of Mr. Vincent Perez presented their findings from their fall science research during a poster session held at The Academy Charter High School. During the session each student team explained the origin, symptoms, occurrence, and treatment options for an infectious disease. A team's particular disease had been chosen from a listing of the top 25 infectious diseases ranked by the U.S. Center for Disease Control in Atlanta. Each team also presented its proposal for production and distribution of a treatment option. Learn more

  • Ph.D. student Jennifer Long has been named a Newkirk Graduate Student Fellow for 2014-2015 and will receive an $8,000 fellowship in support of her doctoral researchbeing conducted at Crystal Cove State Park in Laguna Beach. Ms. Long is investigating ecohydrology citizen science, posing the question: Can youth develop an understanding of systems by engaging in authentic research? The Newkirk Center for Science and Society, established at UC Irvine in 2001, is dedicated to improving science's response to community needs and to increasing the effective uses of scientific results for the benefit of society. The Center supports conferences, workshops, colloquia, lectures, and funding of research. Ms. Long's doctoral research focuses on formal and informal science education, technology in education, and teacher preparation. Abstract

  • Ph.D. Student Sarah Gilliland has been awarded a $15,000 Promotion of Doctoral Studies II scholarship from the Foundation for Physical Therapy to support her dissertation research. Ms. Gilliland, who holds a doctorate in physical therapy from Chapman University, studies professional development and science education in addition to physical therapy education. Her dissertation, titled "Physical Therapist Students' Clinical Reasoning and Characterizations of Practice," focuses on how PT students learn to think critically and apply knowledge learned in the classroom to clinical practice. Ms. Gilliand’s goal is to develop a line of research that will contribute to the development of guidelines for course and curricular development to promote effective teaching of basic science and clinical information. She is advised by Professor Judith Haymore Sandholtz.

  • Ph.D. student Jin Kyoung Hwang has received two fellowships to support her doctoral research. The International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF) awarded Ms. Hwang a $2,000 research grant. TIRF applies research findings to practical language problems to generate new knowledge about English language teaching and learning. Ms. Hwang received her second scholarship, the $1,000 Korean Honor Scholarship, from the Embassy of the Republic of Korea. For her doctoral work, Ms. Hwang has focused on second language & literacy development, English language learners, reading difficulties, language assessment, and early intervention. Ms. Hwang is a fifth year doctoral student specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT). She is advised by Assistant Professor Joshua Lawrence.

  • Ph.D. student Cathery Yeh has been notified that her second year research paper titled "Preservice Teachers’ Learning to Generate Evidence-Based Hypotheses About the Impact of Mathematics Teaching on Learning" has been accepted for publication by the Journal of Teacher Education. Ms. Yeh's research examined the development of a specific sub-skill for studying and improving teaching - the generation of hypotheses by pre-service teachers (PSTs) about the effects of teaching on student learning. Her research findings revealed that PSTs who attended a course with integrated analysis skills significantly improved in their ability to generate hypotheses based on student evidence. Ms. Yeh is a fifth year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). She is advised by Associate Professor Rossella Santagata

  • Ph.D. student Jessica Tunney has been selected as a 2015 Association of Teacher Educators (ATE) Clinical Fellow. The ATE Clinical Fellows program connects researchers and educators from around the U.S. that share a focus on putting clinical practice to the center of teacher education. Ms. Tunney has also been advised that her dissertation research, "Negotiating a Shared Approach to Supporting Pre-service Teacher Learning in Practice," has been accepted for inclusion in the California Council of Teacher Education (CCTE) Quest for Teacher Education Research Program for the 2014-2015 academic year. A third venue where Ms. Tunney recently shared her research is The Academy Charter High School in Santa Ana. On August 12th she led a workshop for faculty titled "Teaching Up: A Differentiated Approach to Lesson Planning."

  • Ph.D. student Janet Garcia Mercado will be participating in the California State Los Angeles Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE) Annual Retreat in Lake Arrowhead September 5-8. The MORE program was established to enhance the development of minority students who wish to pursue research careers in basic science disciplines, mathematics, and engineering. As an alumna of the MORE program, Ms. Mercado will participate in a panel discussion to share her doctoral experiences and deliver a 15-minute presentation on her research project "Noticing Equitably in Mathematics Teaching." Mr. Mercado, a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD), researches mathematics, aptitudes, motivation, pedagogical approaches, teacher learning, technology in the classroom, and student diversity.

Summer 2014

  • Ph.D. student Alma Zaragoza-Petty has been awarded an inaugural College Board Professional Fellowship. "The fellowship is designed to recognize, support, and reward rising leaders from African American, Latino, and Native American background who are working effectively to close achievement and attainment gaps in their schools, colleges, and communities across the country." Ms. Zaragoza Petty will receive $5,000 in support of her efforts to advance educational achievement among African American and Latino American students and promote higher education access and equity for underrepresented populations. Ms. Zaragoza-Petty, a Eugene Cota Robles Scholar, is a fifth year  doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). She is advised by Assistant Professor Tesha Sengupta-Irving.

  • Ph.D. Student Anamarie Auger is lead author on a new publication in Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology (July-August 2014): "The Effects of Baby Books on Mothers' Reading Beliefs and Reading Practices." Co-authors are Associate Professor Stephanie Reich and doctoral student Emily Penner. Ms. Auger and Ms. Penner (Educational Policy and Social Context specialization) will receive their degrees this September. Ms. Auger is joining the Rand Corporation as a Research Scientist. After a two-year post-doctoral position at Stanford University, Ms. Penner will return to UC Irvine as an Assistant Professor of Education. Abstract

  • Ph.D. Student Elizabeth Miller is lead author on a new publication in Child Development (July/August 2014): "Do the Effects of Head Start Vary by Parental Preacademic Stimulation?" Co-authors are Professor George Farkas, Deborah Lowe Vandell, and Greg Duncan. Ms. Miller studied data gathered from 3,185 three to four-year-old children in Head Start (Head Start Impact Study) to determine whether one year of Head Start differentially benefited children from homes with high, middle, and low levels of parental preacademic stimulation on three academic outcome domains—early math, early literacy, and receptive vocabulary. Ms. Miller, a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC), studies socio-emotional development, parent-child interactions, and early childhood care and education. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student student Jacky Au has been notified that his article ""Improving Fluid Intelligence with Training on Working Memory: a Meta-Analysis" has been accepted for publication in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. Mr. Au is a second year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). His research interests include cognitive training, working memory training, executive function, and neuroimaging. Prior to joining the doctoral program, Ms. Au spent five years engaged in research at UC Davis Medical Center and the UC Davis MIND Institute. During his first year at UC Irvine, Mr. Au joined Assistant Professor Susanne Jaeggi's Working Memory and Plasticity Lab, where he currently is working on the grant "Training Cognitive Control to Improve Self-Regularoy Behavior and Mental Health in Adolescents." Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Huy Chung and Associate Professor Elizabeth van Es presented at the 11th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) in Boulder, Colorado, June 23-27: "Varied Appropriations of Tools from Professional Development: Moving Beyond Levels." The conference theme, "Learning and Becoming in Practice," focused on ways that learning processes are situated within different kinds of practices. Context and process practices include engaging in the epistemic practices of disciplines, participating in sociocultural practices, and engaging in design. Two additional practices, analyzing and modeling learning across settings and time and designing for scale and sustainability, highlight how learning scientists organize their work. Mr. Chung, a GATES Millenium Scholar, is specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Christa Mulker Greenfader presented with Assistant Professor Jeannette Mancilla-Martinez at the annual conference of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR). Their presentation, "Language Skills Among Children from Spanish-Speaking Homes in Early Childhood: A Pilot Study," was delivered during the session "Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers’ Vocabulary: Tracking Progress and Facilitating Development." Ms. Greenfader is a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). Her research interests include learning through the arts; cognitive, social, and emotional development; learning and motivational methods; learning in and out-of-school, and educational equity. She is advised by Associate Professor Liane Brouillette. Abstract 


  • The 2014 Michael E. Martinez Prize for Outstanding Research and Service has been awarded to fifth doctoral student Teya Rutherford. Fourth year doctoral student Cathery Yeh received Honorable Mention. The Prize, established to honor the scholarly and professional achievements of the late Michael E. Martinez, Professor of Education at the University of California, Irvine, is given to a doctoral student who demonstrates superior scholarship, intellectual curiosity, and high levels of professionalism and collaboration with fellow students and/or faculty. More

  • Ph.D. Student Kenneth Lee has received the 2014 Associate Doctoral Students in Education (ASDE) Outstanding Service Award. ASDE is an orgtanization of Ph.D. in Education students dedicated to fostering community and ensuring that student interests, concerns, comments, and questions are heard and addressed in a representative manner. Mr. Lee was recognized for his many contributions to the School, the doctoral program, and his fellow students, including coordinating professional development seminars for doctoral students, assisting with recruitment and admissions, and organizing social events.


  • Ph.D. student Ksenia Korobkova presented with Associate Professor Rebecca Black at the Games, Learning, and Society (GLS) Conference, held June 10 through 13 in Madison, Wisconsin. The title of their presentation was "Learning, Play, and Identity in Gendered Lego Franchises." GLS designs games for learning and studies game-centered learning systems. The society is interested in the ways in which videogames capture imagination, how this can be used to transform learning, and what such engagement means for society. Ms. Korobkova is a third  year doctoral student specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT). Her research interests include anthropology of education, use of technology in the classroom, new media, and research methods and knowledge production in social science research. She is advised by Dr. Black.


  • Undergraduates Martha Han, Christine Bediones, Chris Berizko, and Chantal Fry presented at the Games, Learning, and Society (GLS) Conference in Madison, Wisconsin, June 10-13. They are members of the Multidisciplinary Design Program Team mentored by faculty members AnneMarie Conley and Bill Tomlinson and doctoral students Cathy TranNeil Young, and Katerina Schenke . Han, Tran, and Schenke's poster presentation was titled "How Kids Informed the Development of a Science Game." "Down with Food: An iPad Game About Digestion," was a prototype demonstration showcased at the conference by Berizko, Fry, and James Gamboa.  

Spring 2014


  • Ph.D. Student Kreshnik Begolli presented with Lindsey Richland and Rebecca Frausel of the University of Chicago at the 26th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science (ASP) in San Francisco, May 22-24. Their poster presentation was titled “Drawing Connections Under Pressure in the Mathematics Classroom: Linking Gestures Can Help.” The APS Convention brings together psychological researchers and academics to showcase the latest innovative research in psychological science, increase support for psychological research, and promote the use of science-based psychology in the development of public policy. Mr. Begolli is a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). His research interests include perceptual learning, language acquisition, and analogical reasoning. Poster Abstract 

  • Ph.D. Student Alma Zaragoza-Petty, a Eugene Cota Robles Scholar, has been awarded a President’s Dissertation Year Fellowship. This year UC Irvine awarded six fellowships to UC Irvine students in their final year of graduate study who plan to pursue teaching and research appointments. The award provides full resident tuition and fees, a yearly stipend, a travel stipend, and opportunities for additional research support. For her dissertation, Ms. Zaragoza-Petty is undertaking a year-long ethnography of an alternative charter high school in the Los Angeles area. Ms. Zaragoza-Petty is a fifth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). Her research interests include race/ethnicity; gender, class, and educational achievement; and higher education access and equity. She is advised by Assistant Professor Tesha Sengupta-Irving.

  • Ph.D. Student Dan Flynn led the discussion group titled “Qualitative Data Analysis, Grounded Theory Virtual Analysis Team Workspaces” at the Association for Institutional Research’s Annual Conference AIR Forum 2014, in Orlando Florida, May 27-30. The Forum brings together over 2,000 higher education professionals working in institutional research, assessment, planning, and related postsecondary education fields. Mr. Flynn is a fifth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). His research interests include higher education: assessment and evaluation, scholarship of teaching and learning, and faculty/professional development in STEM education. He is advised by Associate Professor Thad DominaAbstract for Discussion Group 

  • Ph.D. student Melissa Niiya authored with colleagues a paper published in the proceedings of the Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI) Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. Titled "Stress Multitasking in Everyday College Life: An Empirical Study of Online Activity," the paper was presented at the April conference in Toronto Canada. SIGCHI is a society for professionals, academic, and students who are interested in human-technology and human-computer interaction (HCI) Ms. Niiya, a second year doctoral student specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT), studies digital literacy, diversity and equity, and interactive media and technology in education. She is advised by Professor Mark WarschauerAbstract

  • Ph.D. student Jacky Au is first author on the presentation "Improving Fluid Intelligence with Training on Working Memory: A Meta-Analysis," presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, held May 22-26 in San Francisco. Additional authors included Ellen Sheehan, Ph.D. student Nancy Tsai, Ally Stegman (University of Maryland), Distinguished Professor Greg Duncan, Martin Buschkuehl, and Assistant Professor Susanne Jaeggi. Mr. Au and Ms. Tsai are first year doctoral students specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD) and advised by Dr. Jaeggi. Mr. Au's research interests include cognitive training, working memory training, executive function, and neuroimaging. Nancy Tsai's researches development of executive functions, and development and evaluation of interventions to promote learning. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Marcela Martinez received an honorable mention in the UC Irvine Faculty Mentor Program (FMP) competition. For her research design, Ms. Martinez described how she will be collecting detailed data about a district partners’ middle school mathematics placement procedures, as well as data on student characteristics, school experiences, and achievement in order to gain new insights into how educators sort students for middle school mathematics instruction and the consequences of these sorting decisions for student achievement. Ms. Martinez is a third year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). Her research interests include macro- and micro-level factors contributing to individual academic success. She is advised by Associate ProfessorThad Domina.

  • Ph.D. students Christa Mulker Greenfader and Elizabeth Miller have published in Early Childhood Research: "The Role of Access to Head Start and Quality Ratings for Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners’ (DLLs) Participation in Early Childhood Education." Ms. Greenfader, a third year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD), is advised by Associate Professor Llane Brouillette. Ms. Miller, who is advised by Professor George Farkas, is in her third year of doctoral study pursuing a specialization in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). Abstract

  • Doctoral students and undergraduates from the School of Education volunteered as readers and book distributors during the 7th Annual Head Start Family Festival, held April 12 at the Sunkist Branch Library/Juarez Park in Anaheim. During the afternoon event, the students read to children, distributed over 5,000 books donated by Orange County community members, and participated in storytelling activities. The Festival provides educational information and resources to families, including free health screenings. Collaborative partners for 2014 included the Orange County Association for the Education of Young ChildrenAnaheim Public LibrariesPIMCO Foundation, and Illumination Foundation. School of Education participation was coordinated by Associate Professor Stephanie Reich, member of the Head Start Board of Directors, and doctoral students Joyce Lin and Chenoa Woods.

  • The School of Education's Multiple Subject Credential Program partnered with Davis Magnet Elementary School to host a panel session for graduating credential candidates. The afternoon session, facilitated by Multiple Subject Program Coordinator Susan Toma-Berge, included both responses by the five principals on the panel to questions posed by Dr. Toma and group breakout sessions that encouraged volunteers to role-play an interview session with the principal, who then provided feedback. The afternoon closed with a general question and answer session centered on job-seeking tips and advice. Read more.


  • Ph.D. student Cathy Tran has been awarded a National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship for the 2014-2015 academic year. Ms. Tran, one of 30 awardees out of a pool of 400 applicants, will receive $25,000 to support her dissertation research. NAE/Spencer Fellowship are given to support individuals whose dissertations are judged to show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world. Selection criteria include (a) importance of the research questions to education, (b) quality of the research approach, (c) feasibility of the work plan, (d) applicant's future potential as a researcher, and (e) applicant's interest in education. Ms. Tran's dissertation work is titled "Designing for Productive Persistence after Failure in Education." Dissertation Abstract 

  • Ph.D. student Jin Kyoung Hwang is first author on a publication in the International Journal of Bilingualism: "Differential Effects of a Systematic Vocabulary Intervention on Adolescent Language Minority Students with Varying Levels of English Proficiency." Additional authors are Joshua Lawrence, Elaine Mos, and Catherine Snow. Ms. Hwang's paper examines different performance profiles of students within a language minority population and investigates whether they respond similarly or differently to an academic vocabulary intervention, Word Generation. Ms. Hwang is a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). Her research interests include second language and literacy development, ELLs, reading difficulties, language assessment, and early intervention. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Alma Zaragoza Petty has been selected for the 2014-2015 California Community College Internship Program (CCCIP). CCCIP offers graduate students aspiring to pursue an academic career in teaching, policy development, or administration the opportunity to learn about faculty life, governance, and teaching at one of the local community colleges. Selected MFA and PhD students with strong teaching backgrounds who meet the eligibility requirements are partnered with faculty at community colleges affiliated with UC Irvine for a period of two to three consecutive quarters. Ms. Zaragoza Petty will be mentored by Professor Martha Vargas at Santa Ana College. Ms. Zaragoza Petty is a fifth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). She is advised by Assistant Professor Tesha Sengupta-Irving.

  • Ph.D. student Cathery Yeh was honored at the recent UC Irvine Celebration of Teaching Awards Ceremony for her 2013-2014 service as a Pedagogical Fellow. Each year, Pedagogical Fellows representing various Schools are selected by the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center (TLTC) from a competitive pool of applicants. During the academic year, the Fellows assist in the training and mentoring of graduate students selected as Teaching Associates. Selection criteria for Pedagogical Fellows include the applicant's teaching evaluations, letters of recommendation, and demonstrated interest in pedagogy. Ms. Yeh, who is a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD), was one of 17 Fellows honored at the April 12th ceremony for their contribution to quality undergraduate education.

  • Ph.D. student Melissa Niiya was third author on an article published with colleagues Professor Mark Warschauer, Assistant Professor Binbin Zheng (Michigan State University), and Professor George Farkas in Equity and Excellence in Education. Titled "Balancing the One-to-One Equation: Equity and Access in Three Laptop Programs," the article examined one-to-one laptop programs in Colorado, California, and Alabama. Findings revealed different outcomes among the programs, although all utilized low-cost netbook computers and open source software and shared common goals of enhancing digital participation and increasing educational equity. Ms. Niiya, a second year doctoral student specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT), studies digital literacy, diversity and equity, and interactive media and technology in education. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Tyler Watts was awarded the Dean's Prize during the recent Associated Graduate Students (AGS) Symposium on April 18th. Mr. Watts received $1,000 toward his doctoral research for his presentation titled "Do Kindergarten Common Core Standards Domains Predict Later Math Achievement?" The AGS Symposium is held yearly to highlight research that transcends disciplinary boundaries in an effort to find solutions to major societal problems or make groundbreaking discoveries. Graduate students are encouraged to present their research in a approachable ten-minute non-academic talk. Mr. Watts, a third year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC), researches early childhood intervention and the impact of income and social environment in later academic achievement. Abstract

  • Students from The Academy Charter High School Visit UC Irvine and Education Theme House
  • Ph.D. student Brandy Jenner presented at the Pacific Sociological Association's (PSA) 85th Annual Meeting held March 25-30 in Portland, Oregon. The 2014 meeting theme was “(Un)Changing Institutions:  Work, Family, and Gender in the New Economy.” Ms. Jenner's first presentation was titled "Concerted Cultivation and Accomplishment of Natural Growth in Parent-Child Interactions at IKEA" (Abstract). Her second presentation was titled "An Analysis of Military Enlistment, College Enrollment, and Labor Force Participation Among High School Graduates" (Abstract). Ms. Jenner, a second year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC), has research interests in higher education access, persistence, and equity; education policy; higher education program evaluation; student veterans; and for-profit colleges/universities.

  • Ph.D. student Chris Stillwell has been advised that his most recent book Language Teaching Insights from Other Fields: Sports, Arts, Design, and More has just been shortlisted for an award for Innovation in Teacher Resources by the British Council ELTons, sponsored by Cambridge English. The ELTons are the only international awards that recognize and celebrate innovation in English language teaching (ELT). They reward educational resources that help English language learners and teachers to achieve their goals. Mr. Stillwell is a second year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD). His research interests include teacher learning, collaborative professional development, peer observation, and student self-transcription of language learning tasks.

  • Ph.D. student Kenneth Lee presented his poster, developed in collaboration with Distinguished Professor of Education Greg Duncan, at the Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) Biennial Meeting held March 20-22 in Austin, Texas. The title of his presentation was "Links Between Average Middle Childhood Problem Behaviors and Adult Health." Abstract:Adult obesity has been linked to a number of negative adult emotions or behavior problems, such as anger, loneliness, boredom, and depression. Childhood obesity has been found to be a key predictor for obesity in adulthood. Since adult behavior problems are linked to adult health and childhood health is predictive of adult health, this paper examines the potential for significant associations between childhood behaviors and early adult BMI (body mass index).

  • Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) student Brenda Minjares has been awarded a Knowles Science Teaching Foundation (KSTF) Fellowship in support of her studies. Ms. Minjares is pursuing her Master of Arts with a Single Subject Teacher Credential in Physics. Knowles Fellowships are awarded to early career STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) teachers and provide financial and professional development support. As part of her professional support, Ms. Minjares will attend three meetings per year, work one-on-one with a KSTF program officer for teacher development, and participate in an online community. The Knowles Science Teaching Foundation was established in 1999 to increase the number of high-quality high school STEM teachers with the ultimate goal improving STEM education in the United States.

  • Ph.D. student NaYoung Hwang was sole author of her paper and poster presented at the Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) Biennial Meeting held March 20-22 in Austin, Texas. SRA, founded in 1984, focuses on the theoretical, empirical, and policy research issues of adolescence. Current membership includes 1,300 educators representing 30 countries. The title of Ms. Hwang's presentation was "Does Paid Work Hinder Math Achievement?" Ms. Hwang, a second year doctoral student specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT), is pursuing research interests in second language and literacy development, English Language Learners, reading difficulties, language assessment, and early intervention. She is advised by Associate Professor Thad DominaAbstract 

  • Ph.D. student Alma Zaragoza-Petty was sole author of her presentation at the Southern Sociological Society Meeting, April 2 through 4 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The conference theme was "Poverty, Social Policy, and the Role of Sociologists." Ms. Zaragoza-Petty's presentation was titled "Cuentos and Testimonios: Professional Socialization into Academia." Ms. Petty, a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC), is advised by Assistant Professor Tesha Sengupta-IrvingAbstract: Using Critical Race Theory andcuentos and testimonios as method, this study provides recommendations to graduate programs on how to manage the feelings of alienation and discrimination that scholars of color might experience as a result of being in an educational system that upholds color-blind ideologies based on White, middle-class culture and values.

  • Multiple Subject Candidates Marco Castillo and Megan Gibbs were two of the four bilingual candidates honored during the recent California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) Conference held April 2 through 5 in Anaheim. CABE was established in 1976 to promote bilingual education and quality educational experiences for all students in California. Mr. Castillo received the Charles (Chuck) Acosta Teachership Award; Ms. Gibbs received the Alma Flor Ada Teachership Award. CABE awards $2,000 teacherships to support students pursuing a bilingual teaching credential. Article


Winter 2014

  • Ph.D. student Elizabeth Miller is lead author on the article "Head Start Found More Beneficial for Children Whose Parents Provide Less Early Academic Stimulation." The article will appear in the next issue of Child Development, a publication of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). Professors George FarkasDeborah Lowe Vandell, and Greg Duncan are co-authors. In drawing her conclusions, Ms. Miller analyzed data from the Head Start Impact Study, a nationally representative sample of nearly 5,000 newly entering eligible 3- and 4-year olds. Ms. Miller, a third year doctoral student advised by Professor George Farkas, is specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). Her research interests include socio-emotional development, parent-child interactions, early childhood care and education. SRCD Press Release

  • Ph.D. student Sarah Gilliland was presented with the Education Section “Adopt a Doc” Scholarship at the Combined Sections Meeting of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), held February 3-6 in Las Vegas. The APTA program awards one $2,500 scholarship per year to increase the number of doctorally prepared faculty teaching in Physical Therapy (PT) and Physical Therapy Assistant (PTA) education programs. The award provides financial support to current or former PT or PTA faculty members who are in the dissertation phase of their doctoral programs. Ms. Gilliland, who holds a Doctorate in Physical Therapy, has been an adjunct faculty member at Chapman University teaching human anatomy, biomechanics, kinesiology, complementary medicine and wellness, neurology, and assisting in a variety of laboratory courses since 2008.

  • Ph.D. student Marcela Martinez has been invited to present at the first annual Associated Graduate Students (AGS) Symposium to be held on April 18 at UC Irvine. The title of her talk is "Motivational Predictors of Math Course Persistence." The AGS Symposium provides a venue for outstanding graduate and professional student researchers to showcase how they are utilizing collaborative or innovative methods to tackle important problems in their field. AGS, a student-administered organization open to all UCI graduate students, advocates on behalf of graduate students interests at local, state, and national levels; funds graduate-student initiated events and projects; and provides conference support opportunities. Ms. Martinez, a Eugene Cota Robles Scholar, studies macro- and micro-level factors contributing to individual academic success. Abstract 

  • Ph.D. student Alma Zaragoza-Petty shared findings from her dissertation research during the Chican@ Studies Alliance conference at California State University, Fullerton's on March 1. The title of her presentation was “(De)Colonizing Futures: ‘At Risk’ Students.” In her research Ms. Zaragoza-Petty examined how the notion of "at risk" informs the practices and policies in a charter school environment. Ms. Zaragoza-Petty, a Eugene Cota Robles scholar, is a fourth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). Her research interests include race/ethnicity, gender, class, and educational achievement, higher education access and equity. She is advised by Assistant Professor Tesha Sengupta-Irving.
    Abstract  

  • Ph.D. student Alex Lin is sole-author on the article "Examining Students’ Perceptions of Classroom Openness as a Predictor of Civic Knowledge: A Cross-National Analysis of 38 Countries," published in the February edition of Applied Developmental Science. Mr. Lin is entering his fifth year of the UCI doctoral program specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC). His research interests include positive youth development, civic education, and comparative education. Prior to joining the UC Irvine Ph.D. program, Mr. Lin was a researcher for an international relief program called Equal Access that produces educational media programming for women and children living in rural and remote areas of Afghanistan, Nepal, India, Laos, and Cambodia. Mr. Lin also completed the UCI credential program and taught in public schools across Japan. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Alejandra Albarran has published with Associate Professor Stephanie Reich in Infant and Child Development: "Using Baby Books to Improve New Mothers' Self-Efficacy (MSE) and Improve Toddler Language Development." Their article explores whether educational books, embedded with information about typical child development and optimal parenting, increase MSE for women over the first year and a half of motherhood and whether these increases result in better language skills for children at 18 months of age. In their findings, hierarchical linear model analyses show that (a) MSE starts high and remains high, (b) that providing educational books further increases the development of MSE, and (c) that increases in MSE have a positive impact on children's language skills, as does providing books, irrespective of educational content. 

  • Ph.D. student Jennifer Sun is presenting with Associate Professor Elizabeth van Es at the 2014 Annual Conference of Association for Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) Symposium: Teacher-Capture Video: Tools, Opportunities, and Challenges. Ms. Sun and Dr. van Es draw on their experiences using video for teacher education to demonstrate assorted tools for video capture and video analysis, including  Edthena, a video annotation tool in one of the CalTeach courses. Additionally, they discuss opportunities and challenges for use of video in teacher education, present research findings related to teacher-captured video as a focus for teacher education and professional development, and identify issues for future research. Ms. Sun is a third year doctoral student specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD).

  • Ph.D. student Janet Mercado and Associate Professor Elizabeth van Es are presenting at the 2014 Annual Conference of Association for Mathematics Teacher Educators Conference in Irvine. During their presentation, titled "Noticing for Equitable Mathematics Teaching," Ms. Mercado and Dr. van Es invite teacher participants of a research study on noticing for equitable mathematics to share with the attendees how they notice equity in teaching and how their noticing reflects their commitments and dispositions to equitable mathematics instruction. Following exploration of preliminary findings from their study of teacher noticing during instruction, the researchers discuss how their diverse ways of noticing are reflected in the existing framework and how their noticing challenges existing notions of noticing for equitable teaching to expand understanding of this construct for teaching.

  • Ph.D. student Cathey Yeh, who is specializing in Learning, Cognition, and Devleopment (LCD), is presenting with Lecturers Valerie Henry and Jody Guarino at the 2014 Annual Conference of Association for Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) Conference in Irvine. The title of their presentation is "Designs, Tools, and Implications for Developing Teachers' Noticing of Student Thinking." During their session the presenters will discuss three technology-enhanced environments for helping pre-service elementary and secondary mathematics teachers learn to notice student thinking: video-based instructional tasks for elementary and secondary pre-service mathematics teachers to develop noticing skills and a week-long instructional unit with the course blog highlighting the teacher's attention to student thinking. Abstract

  • Fourth year Ph.D. student Cathery Yeh is one of eight recipients selected from a nation-wide pool of 225 highly-qualified applicants for the 2014 K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders AwardThe Award recognizes graduate students who show exemplary promise as future leaders of higher education, who demonstrate a commitment to developing academic and civic responsibility in themselves and others, and whose work reflects a strong emphasis on teaching and learning. As stated by Carol Geary Schneider, Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) President, “They represent the finest in the new generation of faculty who will teach and lead higher education in the next decades." Ms. Yeh's research interests include diversity and equity in education, teacher learning, pre-service mathematics teacher development, and teacher professional development. 

  • Ph.D. student Daniel Flynn is the sole author on the article “Baccalaureate Attainment of College Students at 4-Year Institutions as a Function of Student Engagement Behaviors: Social and Academic Engagement Behaviors Matter.” The article, currently published online at Research in Higher Education’s Online First, is in press for publication in Research in Higher Education. Mr. Flynn, a fifth year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC), is advised by Associate Professor Thad Domina. Mr. Flynn’s research interests include student engagement, STEM pedagogy, postsecondary instructional and faculty development and Technological-Pedagogical-Content- Knowledge. Abstract

  • Ph.D. students Bianca Cung and Suhang Jiang presented with Professor Mark Warshauer at the MOOC (Mass Open Online Courses) Research Initiative Conference in Arlington, Texas, on December 6, 2013. Their presentation was titled "Peer Assessment and Academic Achievement in a Gateway MOOC.” The conference brought together researchers from around the world investigating MOOCs, including the grantees of the MOOC Research Initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Ms. Cung and Ms. Jiang, first year doctoral students specializing in Language, Literacy, and Technology (LLT), are advised by Professor Warschauer. Ms. Cung’s research interests include media and technology for education, international education, diversity and equity, STEM, and second language acquisition. Abstract

  • Ph.D. student Elizabeth Miller has published with Professor Mark Warshauer in Learning, Media, and Technology: "Young Children and e-Reading: Research to Date and Questions for the Future." Their paper reviews research on e-reading, in both the pre-tablet and tablet eras, within the context of what is known more generally about literacy development. By proposing topics for future research and discussing methodological issues related to the investigation of these topics, the researchers' goal is to spark further discussion about how to study young children's literacy development in the emerging e-reading era. Ms. Miller, a third year doctoral student specializing in Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC), is advised by Professor George Farkas. Her research interests include socio-emotional development, parent-child interactions, and early childhood care and education.